Financing aboriginal self-government in Canada
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Financing aboriginal self-government in Canada by Marc Malone

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Published by Institute of Intergovernmental Relations in Kingston, Ont .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Canada

Subjects:

  • Indians of North America -- Canada -- Finance.,
  • Indians of North America -- Canada -- Politics and government.,
  • Indians of North America -- Canada -- Government relations.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 55-64.

StatementMarc Malone.
SeriesAboriginal peoples and constitutional reform., no. 9
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE92 .M35 1986
The Physical Object
Paginationxiii, 64 p. ;
Number of Pages64
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2313456M
ISBN 100889114412
LC Control Number86193268

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Building on the success of the first two editions, this volume briefly recaps the historical development and public acceptance of the concept of Aboriginal self-government, then proceeds to examine its theoretical underpinnings, the state of Aboriginal self-government in Canada today, and the many practical issues surrounding : Paperback. Aboriginal Self-government in Canada: Current Trends and Issues. This volume expands and updates the analysis, commenced in the first edition, of important practical issues that must be addressed as self-government becomes fully operational. Financing aboriginal self-government in Canada / Author: Marc Malone. --Publication info: Kingston, Ont.: Institute of Intergovernmental Relations, Queen's.   In this provocative and passionate book, Dan Russell outlines the history of Aboriginal self-government in Canada. He compares it to that of the United States, where, for over years, tribes have practised self-government -- domestic dependent nationhood. Russell provides specific examples of how those institutions of government operate, and Cited by: 9.

This book contains 13 chapters analyzing important practical issues that must be addressed as Aboriginal self-government becomes fully operational in Canada. These issues are related to social problems and policies, criminal justice, community services, education, employment and job training, finance, the land base of government, women's rights and concerns, and Metis political by: 7. FINANCING ABORIGINAL SELF-GOVERNMENT I. Introduction Self-government by aboriginal communities, as with any other community, necessarily implies fiscal responsibilities. The exercise of those fiscal responsibilities requires financing whether from own sources or from the outside.   Building on the success of the first two editions, this volume briefly recaps the historical development and public acceptance of the concept of Aboriginal self-government, then proceeds to examine its theoretical underpinnings, the state of Aboriginal self-government in Canada today, and the many practical issues. In this provocative and passionate book, Dan Russell outlines the history of Aboriginal self-government in Canada. He compares it to that of the United States, where, for over years, tribes have practised self-government -- domestic dependent nationhood. Russell provides specific examples of how those institutions of government operate, and eloquently explains, from an Aboriginal.

This book is an interdisciplinary guide for practitioners, policy makers, and students interested in learning about government policy and the aspirations of Canada’s Aboriginal peoples. With the exception of three updated chapters, all of the material by the 31 contributors in this volume is new and original.   Building on the success of the first two editions, this volume briefly recaps the historical development and public acceptance of the concept of Aboriginal self-government, then proceeds to examine its theoretical underpinnings, the state of Aboriginal self-government in Canada today, and the many practical issues surrounding implementation.5/5(1). The Nisga'a agreement covering part of NW British Columbia was truly the first postcolonial land claims settlement in Canada, the author argues. The book analyzes the impact the agreement has on federal/provincial/First Nations relations and in a concise manner examines the .   Consult this map (PDF version: kb, 1 page) to learn about the self-government agreements signed to date across Canada and search the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Information System to find out more about each agreement, including the full text of the agreement and summary information. Use the name of the Indigenous group, agreement name, or.